Posts Tagged ‘activism’

100 DAYS OF ACTIVE RESISTANCE :: the Book

Sunday, December 18th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_5129" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="100 Days of Active Resistance"][/caption] 100 Days of Active Resistance is a beautiful compilation of images that "go deep in order to understand who we are, what the world is and how things could be better." On Day 87 you'll find the MAKE [THIS] BETTER poster. Buy the book.
  • In 2010 Vivienne Westwood and Lee Jeans launched an online manifesto-installation titled 100 Days of Active Resistance. The website invited people to submit an artwork, slogan or photograph responding to Westwood's conception of Active Resistance to Propaganda, in which she argues for culture's capacity to elevate humanity above self-destruction. It is not enough to follow world politics, see films and read the prizewinning bestsellers, she insists; this is superficial, you need to go deep in order to understand who you are, what the world is and how things could be better. This involves culture which can only be acquired by self-education: human beings should mirror the world. Starting on September 8, 2010, for100 days, one artwork was showcased online daily, ending with an exhibition displaying a selection ofthe best contributions. This volume gathers these works and commemorates the project.

A is for Aquifer

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011
Bold Nebraska is leading the charge to protect the Ogallala Aquifer from a pipeline full of dirty tar sands. Protect Our Aquifer, No Oil In Our Soil.

OCCUPY TOGETHER (Free Posters and Materials)

Monday, October 31st, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4957" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="DOWN-UP | Power to the Poster {dot} ORG "][/caption] OCCUPY TOGETHER The posters provided on this page were graciously donated by graphic designers and are free for you to download, print, and hang up within your community, not only to promote local efforts, but the solidarity of all occupiers around the country.

Leaks expected over the life of the TransCanada Pipeline

Thursday, July 14th, 2011
Of course 1 leak is too many when we're talking Oil+Water, but this corporation's own estimates of 11 leaks is simply laughable. Worst Case Spills for TransCanada Pipeline put that number far higher.

INSIDE OUT

Thursday, March 3rd, 2011

TED Prize Winner JR & INSIDE OUT from TED Prize on Vimeo.

2011 TED Prize winner JR has made his wish: “I wish for you to stand up for what you care about by participating in a global art project. And together we’ll turn the world INSIDE OUT.” To participate, upload your portrait: InsideOutProject.net.

TED Favorites (let’s go with three)

Friday, February 25th, 2011
TED2008 Accepting his 2008 TED Prize, author Dave Eggers asks the TED community to personally, creatively engage with local public schools. TED2010 In this poignant, funny follow-up to his fabled 2006 talk, Sir Ken Robinson makes the case for a radical shift from standardized schools to personalized learning -- creating conditions where kids' natural talents can flourish. TEDGlobal 2010 Designer Emily Pilloton moved to rural Bertie County, in North Carolina, to engage in a bold experiment of design-led community transformation. She's teaching a design-build class called Studio H that engages high schoolers' minds and bodies while bringing smart design and new opportunities to the poorest county in the state.

100 Days of Active Resistance

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_3876" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The Image Gallery"][/caption] 100 Days of Active Resistance Every day for one hundred days, one image representing ideas of Active Resistance in the world will be selected from submissions and shared online.
  • 'The principal idea of Active Resistance is that you get out of life what you put in and that real experience of the world involves thinking' - Vivienne Westwood.
  • 100 days of positive thought, active change, speaking up and being heard. From small personal actions to larger collective moments of change, Vivienne Westwood Anglomania and Lee Jeans encourage communication and individuality through an online installation, sharing interpretations of Vivienne Westwood's Active Resistance.
[caption id="attachment_3877" align="alignnone" width="480" caption="Day 87: Don’t just sit there. What would you make better?"][/caption]

When It’s Time to Battle

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010
DESIGN AS ACTIVISM [caption id="attachment_1179" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="ATTENTION!"][/caption] The Battle for Whiteclay is a documentary film project created to call attention to a tragic situation. The film, appropriately described by Indian activist Frank Lamere, "chronicles a painful odyssey that should give pause to the caring, the oblivious, and those who don't give a damn." It doesn't take long to drive through Whiteclay. In a blink of an eye, you pass four liquor stores in a town with a population of 14. Then it's down a two-mile stretch of road to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Hot sun and blue sky overhead. Slow, stale misery on the ground. You get a sense for the centuries of exploitation and abuse. And knowing what's at work in the community, there really is no way to go there and not be moved to act in some way. On Saturday, June 11, 2005, at Noon there was a march from the Reservation in South Dakota to Whiteclay, Nebraska to demand that illegal sales of alcohol to Indians be stopped. Some 11,000 cans of beer are consumed every day. There's crippling poverty. An epidemic of alcohol abuse. On the reservation the unemployment rate is 75% and average life expectancy for men is 48 and 52 for women. It's been a decade long struggle for justice on the streets of Whiteclay to the halls of Nebraska's State Capitol. The point of the march was to increase awareness of the situation and, hopefully, begin ending such a bold illegality. [caption id="attachment_1174" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The People March"][/caption] Known as "skid row on the prairie", Whiteclay continues to be a source of much sadness. The liquor establishments sell their beer.The law is left with too few resources to be enforced. And the people of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation are forgotten. It's contemporary conflict pitting American Indian rights against state and local governments in the United States. [caption id="attachment_1169" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="DVD Packaging"][/caption] Activist and filmmaker Mark Vasina completed the documentary in 2008 and began screening it around the state of Nebraska. It's been a very effective tool helping tell this complicated, often misunderstood issue. It's really a whirlwind of a situation. There's protests and marches both in Whiteclay and in the state capital of Lincoln. There's hearings and testimony. News reports, editorials and opinions. At times, the basic facts can get overlooked. Realizing that four stores in the tiny village sell about four million cans of beer a year to a clientele who has no legal place to drink the beer tells you just about all you need to know. [caption id="attachment_1186" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Images from the struggle | A cycle of despair"][/caption] I became involved with the project around the time I saw the James Victore video made by Hillman Curtis. The social-political "stuff" was more and more the type of work I was drawn to. It sucked me in like no other visual work could. It was persuasion and, as I saw it, extremely important content. It was message with meaning. It was design that gave a damn. It was graphic design behaving as it should, performing the function of the "big fucking club with spikes". You can draw a line from Victore's Columbus Day poster aimed at correcting the legacy of a history of genocide directly to the aesthetic driving the work here. Working with community organizers and political activists, the visuals were meant to be harsh with ruthless urgency, because that's what the situation called for. Steeped in local politics, working for justice in a conservative red state, with a long history of nothing happening. The mediums were activist in nature, but the message was one of practicality. I remember one exchange very well. One of the main organizers said to me, "hell, we can't have a sign that reads 'you've taken our land now you're taking our lives.' It's just not practical. And it turns most people off right away. But 'bring law enforcement to Whiteclay,' someone sees that flipping through the newspaper on a Sunday morning, and they're more likely to say, 'well why the hell not.'" At least that's how we saw things happening. [caption id="attachment_1191" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Stop Alcohol Sales in Whiteclay"][/caption] For myself, the project has always been about taking on a wrong and trying to get people to help make it right. It's not an overnight endeavor. It's slow, arduous politics. The grit of the campaign takes the gravel of that two-mile stretch of road and gives it some kind of context. But once that context is established, nothing will change without a sustained effort. It is poison that's being sold up there, and it's crippling an entire population in the name of "it's just business." We tend to put emphasis on the economic over the social in America, and you can see that play out in Whiteclay. [caption id="attachment_1192" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="A simple Wordpress blog keeping people up-to-date on the situation"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_1193" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="On the road: the film has been shown in Denver, New York, Iowa, South Dakota and across Nebraska"][/caption] When there is an injustice, how the facts are communicated matter. How people perceive the situation is crucial. The messages we confront every day through various forms of media tell us where to shop and what to buy, but also what we choose to care about at every level; personal, professional, institutional and governmental. Our world view is shaped and reinforced by the messages we encounter day in and day out. The swirling mass of information and entertainment, opinion and fact, that exists in our culture didn't just happen. It was all designed to one degree or another. Design as activism sits right in the middle of everything else that's made to influence people, trying to motivate the caring, turn on the oblivious and battle those who just don't give a damn. There are many reasons the situation is as bad as it is in Whiteclay. But one remains clear: an injustice is allowed to go on because not enough people are paying attention. And not enough people have been moved to act, yet. -- Justin Kemerling, Designer. justinkemerling.com

THE EXHIBITION (Part II)

Thursday, October 7th, 2010
The large format 24x38" Posters were the main focus of the Exhibition. But a couple interactive elements were added as the installation really got going. In two places people could take part in the MAKE (THIS) BETTER idea by answering the question: "what would you make better?" (Markers were provided.) We recorded video as well, so people could answer more in depth. (The edited video will be posted online soon.) And to go along with Micah's poster series, Kindness, Patience, Forgiveness, little tear-offs were put at the foot of each of the posters.

THE EXHIBITION (Part I)

Monday, October 4th, 2010
From September 9–24 in 2010 The New BLK Gallery + Power to the Poster + Nicholas Burroughs proudly presented POWER TO THE POSTER: THE EXHIBITION 34 Posters Promoting Dissent, Hope & Ideas. For those of you who could not attend, here are some photos.
Participating Designers Herencia - Pablo Pino - Madrid, Spain Marriage is for Everyone - Ryan Slone - Fayetteville, Arkansas Freedom - Jason Dietrick - Harrisburg, Pennsylvania In Solidarity with Gaza - Kevin Yuen-Kit Lo - Montréal, Québec Flowers - Shane Cranford - Winston Salem, North Carolina Status - Justin Kemerling - Omaha, Nebraska Green Economy - Jared Hardy - Boulder, Colorado What Is America? - Justin Kemerling - Omaha, Nebraska Trabajemos - Juan Carlos Campuzano - Puebla, México (Re)Make America - Justin Kemerling - Omaha, Nebraska Code Blue - Steve Alfaro - Washington, DC Russian Roulette - Ahmet Erdogan - Akatlar Istanbul Turkiye Patience - Micah Schmiedeskamp - Denver, Colorado Kindness - Micah Schmiedeskamp - Denver, Colorado Forgiveness - Micah Schmiedeskamp - Denver, Colorado Diplomacy - Jason Dietrick - Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Give A Shit - Jared Rawlings - Lincoln, Nebraska Slavery Is Wrong - Daniel Flahiff - Bellevue, Washington DOWN-UP - Justin Kemerling - Omaha, Nebraska TV - Will Miller, Firebelly Design - Chicago, Illinois Shake Hands - Bizhan Khodabandeh - Richmond, Virginia Sinking Liberty - Kevin Fitzgerald - Lincoln, Nebraska Bomb - Jared Hardy - Boulder, Colorado I Want You- Jason Hardy - San Francisco, California Oil Change - Dustin Tomes - Boulder, Colorado Not My Dream - Katrina Ford - Richmond, Virginia Less War, More Jobs - Paul Nini - Columbus, Ohio Emigration - Mauro Simone & Sara Corvino - Shanghai, China Bring Them Home - Jason Hardy - San Francisco, California What Moves You? - PttP - Earth Let’s Ride - Jason Hardy - San Francisco, California LOOK AWAY - PttP - Earth WarBank - Fulvio Bisca - Torino, Italy Your Own Hands - Luca Bogonia & Nele Brönner - Berlin, Germany A Big ------- Club with Spikes - Nicholas Burroughs - Omaha, Nebraska