Posts Tagged ‘exhibition’

Justice, Equality, Democracy, Opportunity, Community

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4945" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Stronger Together"][/caption] Poster Show Friday the 28th at the New BLK. See you there! From the Nebraska Appleseed blog: Build A Stronger Nebraska Together

Build A Stronger Nebraska :: Lincoln & Omaha Exhibitions

Monday, September 26th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4910" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="LINCOLN: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7TH"][/caption] October 7 · 6:00pm - 10:00pm The Ink Spot at Parrish Studios 1410 O Street Lincoln, NE [caption id="attachment_4911" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="OMAHA: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28TH"][/caption] October 28 · 7:00pm - 10:00pm The New BLK 1213 Jones Street Omaha, NE A poster show benefiting Nebraska Appleseed featuring art from: Paul Berkbigler Doe Eyed Ella Durham + Sam Rapien Justin Kemerling Peter Morris Oxide Design Co. Cathy Solarana Jake Welchert Historically, the poster has been a powerful means of communicating ideals and advocating for change. Nebraska Appleseed called upon leaders in the graphic design community to envision how we can build a stronger Nebraska through greater equality, opportunity and justice for all. We partnered with Justin Kemerling of The Match Factory and Lincoln screen printer Jason Davis of Screen Ink to produce an art exhibition with a collection of posters to inspire all people of our great state to work together to create a more inclusive, more vibrant community. These powerful posters - eleven designs, hand-signed and numbered, twenty-five prints each on 18"x24" silkscreen prints - give voice to Appleseed's core values of Community, Democracy, Equality, Justice and Opportunity.

DIY Spaces of the Tugboat 37

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4448" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Basement Studio | 20th & C, Lincoln, NE"][/caption] When the Tugboat Gallery reopened in April of 2008, I enthusiastically said yes to the invitation of doing the monthly exhibition posters. One 12x18 screenprinted poster a month, editions of 60ish, for three years. Designed and hand-pulled in three different DIY studio locations over the years and put up on the streets of downtown Lincoln by the Tugboat crew. Tugboat Gallery is an alternative gallery located in downtown Lincoln, Nebraska. It's run by Peggy Gomez and Tugboat's new co-captain Nolan Tredway. Joey Lynch and Jake Gillespie, along with Peggy, made up the initial force behind its creation. Located above Gomez Art Supply in the Parrish Studios, it's part of a flourishing downtown art scene and a place to see some of the finest artwork in the Midwest. And the spaces where the posters were printed were equally as fine. [caption id="attachment_4492" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Print Here"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4449" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Bemis Underground | Downtown, Omaha, NE"][/caption] The first studio, where screenprinting for me all began, was in the basement of a big old house on 20th and C in Lincoln's historic district. Amidst boxes and other junk stored by the various tenants—including one Jason Hardy—coating, exposing, blasting, pulling and hanging all went down in the evening hours after the graphic designer day job. I was way into posters at the time and Tugboat was the perfect project. The designing typically happened fast with the printing process taking up to 8-12 hours depending on number of colors and print complexity. There wasn't too much time to over think the design, and what happened was, for the most part, a satisfying result that kept my own design process moving forward and on its toes. While speaking to the art, the final design really just had to look badass. Once it did, it was time to print. I'd get the names of the artists (typically a group show), the name of the exhibition (occasionally Peggy or I would have to come up with one) and some images of the work being displayed, then I'd get to it. Design the poster, get approval from Peggy, and on to the screenprinting—transparencies, coating, exposing, blasting, printing, reclaiming. Repeat. It felt raw. Down and dirty. It smelled of ink and emulsion. It felt like wood and paper. And it looked delightful as the colors would layer over top of each other. Indeed, blue over yellow makes green. And magenta over turquoise looks fucking awesome. [caption id="attachment_4450" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Old Hardware Store | Vinton Street, Omaha, NE"][/caption] When my wife Katie and I moved to Omaha, Joey Lynch let me in on both of his spaces over the course of the next 2+ years. The first was in the Bemis Underground, the second in an old former hardware store in south Omaha. Generously shared spaces complete with power washer and drying rack. And lots more room to let the ink fly and the tape deck spin. The solid array of Jason's unrivaled mixtapes that accumulated over the years is quite impressive. What can I say, no one makes a mixtape like Jason Hardy. No one. All three spaces were as DIY as it gets—from the light tables, to the blast area, to the printing press. They were inspiring zones of "getting down to the making" and uncomplicated hideouts from the business side of graphic design. The first, since Jason and I both lived in apartments in the old house, was a place for collaboration, late night concepting and frequent beer drinking. The Omaha spots were home to the artwork and endeavors Joey was involved in. Inspiring to say the least, with huge artwork screens, print projects for Saddle Creek Records and the creation of the Daily Grub all happening around the printing of poster after poster. Looking back at the three-year collection of poster after poster, Three Way might be my favorite. Four colors, three arrows, two screens and one cow. Enough said. [caption id="attachment_4453" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Three Way | September 2008"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4535" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Stacks of Tugboats"][/caption] I've now moved on from being the "Tugboat Poster Designer." With evolving interests and new work opportunities, I'm focusing the screenprinting aspect of my design practice on personal projects and collaborative efforts. But, of course, the Tugboat 37 will always have a special place in my heart. As will the spaces where the shit went down. VIEW ALL 37 POSTERS -- Justin Kemerling, Designer. justinkemerling.com

It’s Friday, in the Twilight of 2010…

Friday, December 10th, 2010
[caption id="attachment_3590" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="By Scott Albrecht from Re:Form School"][/caption] MORE

Extraordinary Rendition in the Underground

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010
[caption id="attachment_3416" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="HVD: High-Value Detainee"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3415" align="alignnone" width="520" caption="HVD #56SS / First Name: Hassan"][/caption] “[W]e don’t kick the [expletive] out of them. We send them to other countries so they can kick the [expletive] out of them.” A man walks down the street in a foreign city. A car stops, men dressed in black with masks over their faces jump out, grab him and spirit him away to where a private plane -- usually a Gulfstream jet -- is waiting. The man is shackled, perhaps hooded, perhaps drugged. The plane takes off and travels to somewhere in Poland or Romania, Egypt or Syria. The man is held captive, perhaps for months. What he endures is often physical and mental degradation and pain. The scenario may sound like a spy thriller or a video game, but extraordinary rendition is all too real. (break) The term extraordinary rendition is used to describe the practice of secretly capturing suspected criminals or terrorists without the knowledge of anyone else, including the governments of the countries in which individuals reside. They are then secretly rendered to other countries, secret detention centers or “black sites.” This way individuals can be transferred to other locations to be tortured by proxy without ostensibly violating the United Nations Convention Against Torture and without the writ of habeas corpus. (break) The role of the artist is to transcend conventional wisdom, to transcend the word of the establishment, to transcend the orthodoxy, to go beyond and escape what is handed down by the government or what is said in the media. [Howard Zinn, Artists in Times of War]. [caption id="attachment_3426" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Obtain Clearance Here"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3427" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Please sit down and look into the camera"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3521" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="HVDs: "Damn Right.""][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3423" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Watch Your Head"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3430" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="You Are Extraordinary, Safe and Happy to be on the Right Side"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3431" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The United States is a country of laws. Our leaders have sworn to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. We believe in the rule of law. The United States Government must protect its citizens. We and our friends around the world have the responsibility to work together in finding practical ways to defend ourselves against ruthless enemies."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3432" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="And these terrorists are some of the most ruthless enemies we face. We cannot discuss information that would compromise the success of intelligence, law enforcement, and military operations. We expect that other nations share this view. The United States has respected—and will continue to respect—the sovereignty of other countries."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3433" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The United States does not transport, and has not transported, detainees from one country to another for the purpose of interrogation using torture. The United States does not use the airspace or the airports of any country for the purpose of transporting a detainee to a country where he or she will be tortured."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3434" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The United States has not transported anyone, and will not transport anyone, to a country when we believe he will be tortured. Where appropriate, the United States seeks assurances that transferred persons will not be tortured."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3435" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The Official U.S. Booklet"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3421" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Welcome to Extraordinary Rendition. Otherwise known as the right side of history."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3438" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The Wall of Surveillance"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3440" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="An agent records while Air Force One circles in the background"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3441" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The National Security Agency’s (NSA) warrantless electronic surveillance program was created by the government to monitor individuals inside and outside the U.S. without the judicial oversight mandated by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA)."][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3442" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="We Are Watching You"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3524" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="It's Patriotism"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3444" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="The Big Bad Wolf"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3445" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Delightful Pink Bunny Heads"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_3446" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Opening Night in the Underground"][/caption] (break) This exhibition is a collaboration by Tim Guthrie and Doug Hayko with Jamie Burmeister, Peter Cales, Justin Kemerling, Landi Olsen, Nolan Tredway, Carol Zuegner, Sarah Baker Hansen, omahaliveartdivisionaims and aims to encourage discourse about the practice of extraordinary rendition. Read the STORY

PLEASE POST

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010
[caption id="attachment_3548" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="December @ Tugboat"][/caption] PLEASE POST POSTER SHOW The first friday opening reception is on 12/3/10 and runs from 7-10pm. BE THERE!! Tugboat Gallery Lincoln, NE 116 N. 14th Street Above Gomez Art Supply in the Parrish Building A poster show featuring the art and design of Denny Schmickle, Joey Lynch, Bonnie O' Connell, Fred Hosman and Justin Kemerling. The show itself runs from 12/3/10-12/29/10

FACE 2 FACE

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010
Face2Face, a project by the anonymous JR. When we met in 2005, we decided to go together in the Middle-East to figure out why Palestinians and Israelis couldn't find a way to get along together. We then traveled across the Israeli and Palestinian cities without speaking much. Just looking to this world with amazement. This holy place for Judaism, Christianity and Islam. This tiny area where you can see mountains, sea, deserts and lakes, love and hate, hope and despair embedded together. After a week, we had a conclusion with the same words: these people look the same; they speak almost the same language, like twin brothers raised in different families. A religious covered woman has her twin sister on the other side. A farmer, a taxi driver, a teacher, has his twin brother in front of him. And he his endlessly fighting with him. It's obvious, but they don't see that. We must put them face to face. They will realize.

Extraordinary Rendition

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Extraordinary Rendition | Underground

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You Are Extra…

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

Extraordinary Rendition | Underground

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KIOSK

Friday, October 15th, 2010
[caption id="attachment_3224" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Interesting things from interesting places"][/caption] When I was in New York I went to this awesome little store in SoHo called KIOSK. We offer a curated range of prod­ucts from all over the world in an exhibition format. Everything is sourced during our travels; we build the collection while away and then feature what we found at KIOSK for 4 — 6 months. A terribly good time. And I got a sweet comb: The Knights of Nit. Read more on their Where the hell am I? blog.