Posts Tagged ‘screenprint’

Justice, Equality, Democracy, Opportunity, Community

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4945" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Stronger Together"][/caption] Poster Show Friday the 28th at the New BLK. See you there! From the Nebraska Appleseed blog: Build A Stronger Nebraska Together

Build A Stronger Nebraska :: Lincoln & Omaha Exhibitions

Monday, September 26th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4910" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="LINCOLN: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7TH"][/caption] October 7 · 6:00pm - 10:00pm The Ink Spot at Parrish Studios 1410 O Street Lincoln, NE [caption id="attachment_4911" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="OMAHA: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28TH"][/caption] October 28 · 7:00pm - 10:00pm The New BLK 1213 Jones Street Omaha, NE A poster show benefiting Nebraska Appleseed featuring art from: Paul Berkbigler Doe Eyed Ella Durham + Sam Rapien Justin Kemerling Peter Morris Oxide Design Co. Cathy Solarana Jake Welchert Historically, the poster has been a powerful means of communicating ideals and advocating for change. Nebraska Appleseed called upon leaders in the graphic design community to envision how we can build a stronger Nebraska through greater equality, opportunity and justice for all. We partnered with Justin Kemerling of The Match Factory and Lincoln screen printer Jason Davis of Screen Ink to produce an art exhibition with a collection of posters to inspire all people of our great state to work together to create a more inclusive, more vibrant community. These powerful posters - eleven designs, hand-signed and numbered, twenty-five prints each on 18"x24" silkscreen prints - give voice to Appleseed's core values of Community, Democracy, Equality, Justice and Opportunity.

A Collaborative Poetry/Design Project Manifesting Itself in Book Form

Monday, June 20th, 2011
Just East of West is a book of poetry and haiku by Bil Johnson, both a marvelous poet and a close friend of the Match Factory. From a collection of random scribblings, notebooks here and there, some napkins and stapled together associations, we pulled together a strong body of words from this Midwestern poet in the most honest way we could think of; a self-published book with additional hand-done, screenprinted flare. At its conclusion, it appeared to us to be about the Earth and its future. As much a concerning stare at manmade "progress" as hopeful nod to the beauty of what's already out there, and what is next for all of us; love, discovery, rebirth, etc. When all was said and done, what fit in our hands was a catalog of life. We grew up on these great midwestern plains, now they lay open proudly awaiting the next troupe of angelic youth, troubadours in their own right, setting out for burning sky and bright new tomorrows. in three parts If there's a revelation to be made from reading the work, it's that there is good and bad, decay and beauty in all of it. We suffer and celebrate in the gray. The idea of black and white, even right and wrong, is given far too much credence these days. The fact is both are constantly surrounding us, the gray area is where everything worthwhile lives, and you must hold the ups and the downs in your line of site as you move, steady as she goes, along your meandering path toward whatever greater truth you seek.
  • This book project was conceived in the winter of 2008 on a painfully cold day on the great plains over coffee and cabinet picks. It was meant to take some of the most honest poetry I had ever read and put it together in a form that was equally as honest. Honestly concerned about our future on Earth while celebrating the love and life that people around us are a part of every day. Wherever we are on this planet, here we are indeed. Under the energy of the sun, looking up at that black canvas sky, we the little peapods are just living, trying to do the best we can. What this is, what we are, is just a song, just a touch, just a kiss of our humanity in the immense vastness. With that, we wish you happy travels.
[caption id="attachment_4681" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="screenprint postcards"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4682" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="book package"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4686" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="poems"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4687" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="jack the anarchist"][/caption] just east of west design notes: july 2009 what i see as the simplicity and the clarity of this poetry book reinforces the aspects of living within a system that isn't all that complicated. from cover to pages to back cover, the turbulent spinning of life is there in image and tone. the constrained aspects of life in a bowl, on a tiny blue dot turning black before our eyes, offer hope for continued living. tales of the earth, love, life, planet, religion, friendship, nature, animals, all intertwine themselves, mingle, mix, dance, as the words suggest. we're offered directions on "how to live" but upon contradiction, are left with baffled stares. the future, our sons and daughters, our culture and ideas, carry us into great unknowns, what pioneers saw as the frontier. in this case the son, and all his promise. the tiny tree in what used to be a forest, HERE. it is waiting for the son. interwoven with the part of life that interconnects, the sweet sound of poetry, the haiku, set to rhythmic syllables. what are we afraid of? not sure. nothing i guess, with such a gift of language to light our way, tell our story, advise our kids, direct ourselves, for life on this planet. is it all turning black? the sky soon to be left crisp once the fossils are emitted up into the sky blocking the heavens, blotting out the sun? the stars, trees, mountains, and waves, is all that is left, the markings of a child? sent to the future by the tomorrow? so many questions. so many thoughts. are we directionless? is there light guiding us? are we the shark in the fish bowl? too big, a relic of a bygone era, with no place else to go, hovering in the dark? or there may be a single tree, just east of west. [caption id="attachment_4696" align="alignnone" width="540" caption=""i want to walk into the woods and inhale""][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4702" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Just East of West"][/caption] -- Justin Kemerling, Designer. justinkemerling.com

Tugboat Posters Featured on CA’s Exhibit

Thursday, April 28th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4595" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Tugboat Gallery exhibition posters CA Exhibit"][/caption] Communication Arts added four of the Tugboat Gallery posters to their very impressive collection of Exhibit work. It's great to get these posted by a creative organization I've always highly respected for their vision and inspiration.

DIY Spaces of the Tugboat 37

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4448" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Basement Studio | 20th & C, Lincoln, NE"][/caption] When the Tugboat Gallery reopened in April of 2008, I enthusiastically said yes to the invitation of doing the monthly exhibition posters. One 12x18 screenprinted poster a month, editions of 60ish, for three years. Designed and hand-pulled in three different DIY studio locations over the years and put up on the streets of downtown Lincoln by the Tugboat crew. Tugboat Gallery is an alternative gallery located in downtown Lincoln, Nebraska. It's run by Peggy Gomez and Tugboat's new co-captain Nolan Tredway. Joey Lynch and Jake Gillespie, along with Peggy, made up the initial force behind its creation. Located above Gomez Art Supply in the Parrish Studios, it's part of a flourishing downtown art scene and a place to see some of the finest artwork in the Midwest. And the spaces where the posters were printed were equally as fine. [caption id="attachment_4492" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Print Here"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4449" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Bemis Underground | Downtown, Omaha, NE"][/caption] The first studio, where screenprinting for me all began, was in the basement of a big old house on 20th and C in Lincoln's historic district. Amidst boxes and other junk stored by the various tenants—including one Jason Hardy—coating, exposing, blasting, pulling and hanging all went down in the evening hours after the graphic designer day job. I was way into posters at the time and Tugboat was the perfect project. The designing typically happened fast with the printing process taking up to 8-12 hours depending on number of colors and print complexity. There wasn't too much time to over think the design, and what happened was, for the most part, a satisfying result that kept my own design process moving forward and on its toes. While speaking to the art, the final design really just had to look badass. Once it did, it was time to print. I'd get the names of the artists (typically a group show), the name of the exhibition (occasionally Peggy or I would have to come up with one) and some images of the work being displayed, then I'd get to it. Design the poster, get approval from Peggy, and on to the screenprinting—transparencies, coating, exposing, blasting, printing, reclaiming. Repeat. It felt raw. Down and dirty. It smelled of ink and emulsion. It felt like wood and paper. And it looked delightful as the colors would layer over top of each other. Indeed, blue over yellow makes green. And magenta over turquoise looks fucking awesome. [caption id="attachment_4450" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Old Hardware Store | Vinton Street, Omaha, NE"][/caption] When my wife Katie and I moved to Omaha, Joey Lynch let me in on both of his spaces over the course of the next 2+ years. The first was in the Bemis Underground, the second in an old former hardware store in south Omaha. Generously shared spaces complete with power washer and drying rack. And lots more room to let the ink fly and the tape deck spin. The solid array of Jason's unrivaled mixtapes that accumulated over the years is quite impressive. What can I say, no one makes a mixtape like Jason Hardy. No one. All three spaces were as DIY as it gets—from the light tables, to the blast area, to the printing press. They were inspiring zones of "getting down to the making" and uncomplicated hideouts from the business side of graphic design. The first, since Jason and I both lived in apartments in the old house, was a place for collaboration, late night concepting and frequent beer drinking. The Omaha spots were home to the artwork and endeavors Joey was involved in. Inspiring to say the least, with huge artwork screens, print projects for Saddle Creek Records and the creation of the Daily Grub all happening around the printing of poster after poster. Looking back at the three-year collection of poster after poster, Three Way might be my favorite. Four colors, three arrows, two screens and one cow. Enough said. [caption id="attachment_4453" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Three Way | September 2008"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_4535" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Stacks of Tugboats"][/caption] I've now moved on from being the "Tugboat Poster Designer." With evolving interests and new work opportunities, I'm focusing the screenprinting aspect of my design practice on personal projects and collaborative efforts. But, of course, the Tugboat 37 will always have a special place in my heart. As will the spaces where the shit went down. VIEW ALL 37 POSTERS -- Justin Kemerling, Designer. justinkemerling.com

Help Japan

Friday, March 18th, 2011
[caption id="attachment_4430" align="alignnone" width="450" caption="Poster by Max Erdenberger"][/caption] From the W+K Studio online store:
  • Upon learning of the devastating earthquake and subsequent tsunami that struck Japan on March 11 we felt a helplessness that compelled us to do something. We quickly designed this poster and offered it as a thanks for anyone donating at least $25 to the relief effort through our site. We'll be donating the net proceeds to the Red Cross.
For more efforts like this, visit GOOD.

Relaunch | The Match Factory Online Store

Monday, January 17th, 2011
A Design Shop for Prints & Projects After a very long hiatus, the online store of the Match Factory has been relaunched. It's now a design shop where you'll find our projects ranging from the personal to the political. And the optimistic. All screenprints are hand-pulled by yours truly and all projects are self-initiated in keeping with our original statement of intent: because making is part of things. We'll be adding more projects in the future and will of course keep things lively. Prints about love? Yes of course. And political activism? Why most definitely. Ah, sweet-sweet variety. As it's a design shop for our prints and projects, all sales will go to the making of more prints and projects. And the cycle will go on as long as it makes sense for us. Thank you for your interest, and for your support.

Let’s Swap

Thursday, December 16th, 2010
Let's Swap is a place where artists and designers can swap art for free. It's brought to you by stellar NYC design firm Hyperakt: meaningful design for the common good. The first featured swap: Food for Thought / Jason Lynch
  • If you had to make a sandwich of all the stuff that inspires you to create, what would it look like? That's precisely what Hyperaktivist Jason Lynch has illustrated. Airplanes, good coffee, crafty booze, robots, and loud guitars are all prominently featured in this limited edition 22" x 30" poster, printed in gray and fluorescent orange by Jason on a gorgeous Folio bright white stock.
[caption id="attachment_3780" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Food for Thought by Jason Lynch"][/caption] Katie and I are part of the "Accepted Swaps" for our print You'll Find Me Frolicking. We're thrilled to be a part of such a great project. [caption id="attachment_3779" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="You'll Find Me Frolicking by Katie + Justin Kemerling"][/caption] The finer details:
  • How does it work? There's one limited edition featured swap at all times. If you want it, hit the Swap button and propose what you want to exchange for it. The featured artist will pick their favorite swaps and they'll be posted on letsswap.it with an artist credit. New featured swaps will be selected on a regular basis. There's no accounts, no fees and no fuss.
  • What's the point? As much as we love the web, there's nothing like holding a beautiful printed piece in your hands or putting it up on your wall. We love posters and books and we know there are tons of talented artists and designers that share this love. We're using the web to celebrate print and using art as currency to collect art.
Share and share alike. And spread the word.

THIS IS AMERICA

Monday, December 13th, 2010
[caption id="attachment_3600" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="19x25" Screenprint on 140lb CVR French Paper; Smart White"][/caption] Hello and Welcome! It's the final weeks of 2010. Holiday time is upon us. Good tidings. Great cheer. Et cetera and so on. And I for one am looking forward to a little down time. A nice bit of "slow down" if you will. Perhaps some reflection, a little visioning for the coming year and for certain some booze. Maybe even lots of booze. This is America after all. Amidst all the food, family and shopping, being driven to drink is certainly a national pastime. Reflecting on America in 2010, there are a couple of other certainties that will be with us as 2011 is ushered in. The war isn't over, even if we want it. The economy not recovered. And the environment is still being left to the polluters. The education system is abysmal for most. Health care now even more corporatized. Big money floods like never before into our elections. More tax cuts for the rich, less jobs for the rest. Glenn Beck is still talking insanity. Sarah Palin's out there doing whatever the hell you call that thing Sarah Palin does. And John Boehner is set to be the new Speaker of the House. While President Barack Obama, from this lefty's perspective, is leaving a lot to be desired. The least we can do, instead of building that damn wall, demonizing the Islamic cultural center in New York or keeping our gay and lesbian service members in the shadows of the military, is all be a little more welcoming. It should be handshake first (or hug, whichever you prefer), suspicion second. It's the core of that American Dream Representative Boehner is so fond of. It wasn't always "innocent until proven guilty". And it doesn't have to be "this is America, learn to speak English, these colors don't run, USA-USA-USA" or whatever else we chant to assert our "dominance." Instead, we can be a little less of a jerk. For the record, we need not worry about taking our country back from anyone. There's plenty of America to go around, we just need to learn to share it a little better. Sometimes it can seem impossible, what with all the wealth up at the top. But we can change that. And fix the environment. And end those wars. And make education available to all. Same with health care. It will take time. And a lot of effort. Along the way, I think it would be best if, instead of that wall and whatever demonizing of the other we've got going on this week, let's put the friendlier side our nature out front first. And save all the energy we've been putting into that damn wall for some new schools instead. So let's keep being the place where anybody, anywhere can come and make a go of it. That's certainly something to be proud of. Now say it with a smile: THIS IS AMERICA. HELLO! AND WELCOME. You can purchase a print of This Is America Hello! and Welcome for $20 HERE. It's my End-O-2010 poster being sold so I can keep doing random projects like this. Thank you for your support. -- Justin Kemerling, Designer. justinkemerling.com [caption id="attachment_3696" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="SHIPPED IN A STURDY TUBE"][/caption]

Tugboat: Year 2

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010
[caption id="attachment_1572" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Tugboat Poster Packs. On Sale. 12 Posters for $100"][/caption] This April at the Tugboat Gallery begins the third year of their space in the Parrish Studios in downtown Lincoln. Part of the First Friday Gallery Walk every month, these exhibitions are quite an expression of a flourishing downtown art scene while bringing people together for a night of community and celebration. To go along with each exhibition, I work with owner Peggy Gomez to design a poster and do a print run of around 75. All totaled we’ve done 25 different poster designs that have become the voice of this non-commissioned art gallery visible on the streets of Lincoln throughout the year. For the two year anniversary we're offering the hand-screened posters from this year. 12 posters, 100 bucks. You can reserve your set now by emailing Peggy. You'll also be able to purchase a set at the gallery walk this Friday from 7 to 10 at Tugboat. [caption id="attachment_1581" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="Yours And Mine | Video Stew"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_1575" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="New Masters & Mentors | Triumvirate"][/caption] [caption id="attachment_1580" align="alignnone" width="540" caption="American Bust | So... How Have You Been?"][/caption]